Image Transfer with Mod Podge

BCC photo transfer on canvas

Transfer your own photography to canvas, fabric or wood using Mod Podge and a laser printer.

MATERIALS:
Mini canvas 3 x 3 inches
Mod Podge, Matte
Small brush
Scissors
Water dish
Paper towels
Coin – penny or nickel
Bone Folder (opt)

NOTES:
The transfer will be the mirror image of the original. To account for this, reverse the image before printing.

INSTRUCTIONS:

BCC image transfer mod podge

Mod Podge

Cut image to size. Working on scrap paper, brush an even layer of Mod Podge over the entire image. Any areas not coated will not transfer.

BCC Image transfer mod podge

 

 

 

 

 

Burnish

Using a bone folder or your finger, gently rub over the back of the image until the paper is smooth and well adhered. Be careful not to tear the paper or get Mod Podge on the blank side of the paper.

BCC  Image transfer mod podge

Clean

Small beads of Mod Podge will form at the edge. Wipe clean with a damp paper towel. If left to dry they will form hard bumps. Set aside to dry.

BCC image transfer

Wet

When Mod Podge is totally dry, dip you finger, or a clean brush, in water and wet the paper. Wet the entire surface until the image can be seen through the paper.

BCC image transfer

Scrape

Using the edge of a coin, gently scrape the paper away. Work carefully as it is easy to scrape away the image as well. If a thin layer of paper remains, with a wet finger quickly but gently rub back and forth over the image. Repeat as necessary.

Linocut Valentines

Bull City Craft Lino Cut Card

Tell your valentine they’re special with a hand printed card. Linocut is a form of relief printing. The negative space is carved away, leaving the image in relief. The raised image is easy to ink and print by hand.

SIZE: Lino block: 2.75 x 4.5 inches

MATERIALS:

Speedball Speedy-Cut block, 2.75 x 4.5 inches
Speedball lino cutter handle and blades, #1 and #5
Pencils, #2/HB and 4B or softer
Tracing or drawing paper
Blank greeting cards and envelopes
Speedball water based block printing ink (Shown in White and pink mixed from Red, White and Blue)
Rubber brayer
Inking plate, or glass
Baren

NOTES:

Speedy-cut blocks are easier to use and cut than traditional linoleum blocks. Use caution when carving image. Always keep both hands behind blade at all times.

INSTRUCTIONS:

BCC Lino Cut Image

Design

Draw your design on a piece of paper or tracing paper with a #2/HB pencil. Trace over the keep design elements with a 4B or softer pencil.

Lino Valentine 2

Transfer

Turn paper over on top of Speedy-Cut block and rub lightly with your finger or bone folder to transfer image.

Lino Valentine 3

Cut Outlines and Details

With #1 cutter, cut the outlines, then cut details. Work from foreground to background.

Lino Valentine 4

Clear Background

Using #5 cutter in big spaces and #1 cutter in small spaces, clear background. Work from center of area to be cleared toward the edges. Be careful not to over cut outlines.

Lino Valentine 5

Print

Use brayer to ink up linocut block. Ink should have the texture of fine grain leather on ink plate. Too little ink will make the image faint. Too much will fill in fine details and make the image blurry.

With inked block face up, carefully lay card on top.

Using the baren (or another tool such as: finger, second brayer, large spoon, bone folder) gently press the paper onto the wet ink.

Pay close attention to large solid areas which often do not print fully.

Shifting paper or squishing the block will distort the image.

Carefully lift printed card off of block, and set aside to dry. Re-ink and repeat for additional cards.

Helpful Tips

Ink should have the texture of fine grain leather on ink plate. Too little ink will make the image faint. Too much will fill in fine details and make the image blurry.

Pay close attention to large solid areas which often do not print fully. Shifting paper or squishing the block will distort the image.

Clean Up

Wipe ink plate and brayer with paper towel, then wash with water, and towel dry.

To remove ink from block, hold under running water or dab with wet paper towel, then blot dry. Rubbing block may cause small pieces to break off.

Printable pdf file: BCC Lino Cut Valentines

Textures with India Ink & Watercolor

Textures with India Ink and Watercolor

Snowy days and starry nights are close at hand. India ink and watercolor are a favorite combination among mixed-media artists, and it’s easy to see why.

India Ink gives a deep matte finish that is perfect for silhouettes. It’s easy to create quick gesture drawings with a sumi brush, or crisp delicate lines with a nib pen.

MATERIALS:

Fluid, Cold Press Watercolor Paper
Pencil and eraser (opt)
Dr. Ph. Martin’s Bombay India Ink, black
Nib pen
Sumi brush
Watercolor paint
1” wash brush
Table salt

NOTES:

Dr. Ph. Martin’s Bombay India Ink is a lightfast and waterproof pigmented India ink. It holds a fine line without spreading and once dry will not re-wet. This makes it perfect for use with watercolor paint and other wet mediums.

INSTRUCTIONS:

India Ink with brush or pen

Draw

With sumi brush (top tree) or nib pen (bottom tree) make a drawing on watercolor paper. If needed a light sketch can be made in pencil first, then inked over, and any visible pencil marks erased after ink is dry.

Textures with India Ink and Watercolor

Paint

When ink is completely dry, use a brush to wet the paper with clear water, then add watercolor paint to create a background wash. While paper is slightly damp, sprinkle salt and watch your snow (or stars) emerge.

Printable pdf: BCC Textures with India Ink and Watercolor

 

Eraser Stamps

Bull City Craft: Eraser Stamp Gift Tags Small details make a big difference. Make your gifts even more special with hand made gift tags.

SIZE:
Small stamp 1 x 1 inch
Large stamp 1 x 2 inches

MATERIALS:
Artgum Eraser in small or large size
Pencil#2/HB, and 4B or softer
X-acto knife
Bone folder (opt)
Canson Pure White Drawing Paper
Metal ruler
Cutting mat
String or ribbon
Scissors
Hole punch or awl
Stamp pad

GIFT TAG PREP:

Cut paper into gift tags using cutting mat, ruler, and x-acto knife. Sizes shown are 1.5 x 3 in, 1.5 x 4 in, 2 x 3 in, and 2 x 4 in.
Punch hole in top of tag and attach ribbon or string.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Bull City Craft: Eraser Stamp Sketch

Design

Draw your design on paper with a #2/HB pencil. Then trace over image with a soft lead pencil, 4B or softer.

Bull City Craft: Eraser Stamp Transfer

Transfer

Turn paper over on top of eraser and rub lightly with your finger or bone folder to transfer image.

Bull City Craft: Cut Eraser Stamp

Cut Outline

Hold knife so that cut is angled away from image.

Bull City Craft: Cut Eraser Stamp

Cut Off Excess

Cut under area to be removed, being careful not to cut under design.

Bull City Craft: Cut Eraser Stamp Details

Cut Details

Cut away details in same manner, angling knife toward area to be removed. Lift excess out with knife.

Bull City Craft: Print Eraser Stamp

Print

Use an ink pad to print your design onto the gift tags.

Printable pdf: BCC Eraser Stamps Instructions

 

 

Mini Mod Podge

Bull City Craft: mini canvas ideas

Sometimes small is just the right size. It’s easy to give yourself permission to explore when there is so little at stake. Here Mod Podge is used as an adhesive and a sealant to protect the paper cut outs that have been collaged onto the canvas in these tiny mixed media pieces.

MATERIALS:
Mini canvas 3 x 3 inches
Mod Podge, Matte
Acrylic paint
Small brushes
Paint pen
Scraps of paper such as: drawing paper, origami paper, repurposed books,
and cut up pieces of your own illustrations, drawings or relief printing.
Scissors
Palette or paper plate
Water dish
Paper towels

INSTRUCTIONS

mini mod podge 2Plan layout 

Cut out images from recycled books or use small pieces of paper with hand printed or drawn images on them. Arrange in a layout you like, then snap a picture or make a sketch to help you remember.

mini mod podge 3

Paint background

Create a background for your image with acrylic paint and Mod Podge (opt). Mod Podge can be used to thin acrylic paint and create a light, transparent color while maintaining vibrancy (as shown).

mini mod podge 4

Mod Podge

Apply Mod Podge to entire surface of canvas. Position and apply paper to canvas. Brush a thin coat of Mod Podge over paper to cover and seal. Brush toward edges of paper to seal well. Repeat as needed for additional layers.

mini mod podge 5

mini mod podge 6

Add Details

Paint can be worked into the wet surface of Mod Podge if desired. Allow to dry about 15-30 minutes, until dry to the touch. Use a paint pen to draw in details. Allow to dry completely, 1-2 hours.

Printable pdf: BCC Mini Mod Podge instructions reduced

Making a Photo Backdrop

I was planning a Valentine Photo Shoot event at the store with Raleigh photographer Elizabeth Galecke, and I offered to make a photo backdrop. We agreed it was a great idea and I jumped on Pinterest to get some inspiration. I noticed right away that most of the backdrops were not painted, but instead embellished with balloons, banners, crepe paper, glitter, and other items that can just be hung on a wall or fence. Hmmm…well, I had promised painted, so I decided to just jump in.

OK, it’s not as easy as it seems.

DIY photo backdrop

We bought a large canvas drop cloth and spread it out in the garage on top of some old drop cloths. We had some leftover chalkboard paint from recently updating the chalkboard in our store. I also had some red and pink paint sample jars that I had gotten free with a magazine coupon. First I primed the whole thing with Low VOC Kilz– it used up the half can I had, and I didn’t even reach the edge of the canvas!

The next night I measured and marked the canvas. I decided to do a simple heart about the width of two people. I sketched the heart and painted it with a combination of the red and pink. I painted around it with the chalkboard paint. I figured if it looked boring, I could always add chalk drawings or text. I also made a felt and paper heart banner and some heart wands for props.

heart wands and banner

The third night I touched up some areas and cleaned up the edge of the heart. When it was finished, Elizabeth came over for a practice photo shoot, and the results are amazing!

Elizabeth Galecke Photography

Elizabeth Galecke Photography

 

Drawing Basics

I’m currently teaching “Drawing and Painting Food and Flowers for Kids” and this summer I’ll be teaching an adult version at the Durham Arts Council. Yesterday we talked about some drawing basics that can really apply to anything that you want to draw.

First, think about techniques and materials. You can draw a simple contour line drawing with pencil or pen, a shaded drawing with pencil or charcoal, or a color drawing using any combination of colored pencil, markers, or pastels. Color can be flat for a more graphic effect, or layered with shading for a 3D effect. Experiment with materials and techniques to find one that you love.

Drawing Food at Bull City Craft

Next, what to draw? Of course you can get ideas from your memory or imagination, but often it helps to start with a reference. Reference material can include drawings by others, photographs, and drawing from life (the actual objects or people). Copying a drawing is the easiest and best way to learn to draw something–artists have used this method for centuries. After practicing by copying, then you can move on to drawing from photos and from life and develop your own style.

Happy drawing!

Drawing Flowers at Bull City Craft